First Release Candidate of Linux Mint 7 KDE

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Linux Mint project proudly announced the official blog the immediate availability of the first release candidate of Linux Mint 7 (Gloria) KDE Community Edition operating system. This first RC is based on the popular Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) distribution, is powered by Linux kernel 2.6.28 and is built on top of the KDE 4.2.4 desktop environment. Just like the other editions of Gloria, this one also includes brand-new artwork, updated applications and many, many new breathtaking features.

. Based on Ubuntu 9.04;
· Linux kernel 2.6.28;
· X.Org 7.4;
· KDE 4.2.4;
· Amarok 2.1;
· New artwork;
· Improved boot speed;
· Improved mintMenu;
· Improved mintInstall;
· Improved mintUpdate;
· Improved mintUpload;
· Added mintWelcome;
· Added apt version, inxi and rtfm command-line tools;
· Moonlight/Silverlight support.

Minimum system requirements:

· A 32-bit processor;
· 512 MB of RAM;
· 10 GB free hard disk space (for installation);
· VGA video card capable of at least 800×600 resolution;
· A CD-ROM drive.

What is Linux Mint? Linux Mint is an elegant, easy-to-use, up-to-date, 100% free and comfortable Linux desktop distribution based on the very popular Ubuntu operating system. It offers paid commercial support to companies and individuals and free community support is available from the forums and the IRC channel.

What Is Linux

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In the early 90s, a geek named Linus Torvalds at the University of  Helsinki  in Finland thought it would be fun to write a Unix kernel from scratch. He called it Linux, and it was cool but pretty much useless without all the utility programs needed to make it a complete operating system. At the same time, Richard Stallman and his pals at the Free Software Foundation were writing a bunch of freeware Unix utilities collectively known as the GNU Project. It was cool but pretty much useless without a kernel to make it a complete operating system. Fortunately, the two parties decided to collaborate.

News of Linux spread quickly over the Internet, and many other Unix programmers joined the effort to enhance it. What we now know as Linux is a combination of Torvald’s Linux kernel, the GNU Project software, and some other nifty software bit and pieces developed by programmers from all around the world.